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Myelodysplasia

Myelodysplasia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) is a group of disorders where the bone marrow does not work well and the bone marrow cells fail to make enough healthy blood cells.

About ten to fifteen thousand persons are diagnosed with MDS in the USA every year.

MDS stands for Myelodysplastic syndromes. "Myeloid" stands for "blood cells" and dysplastic means "funny looking" or misshapen.

MDS is a group of disorders where your bone marrow does not work well, and the bone marrow cells fail to make enough healthy blood cells. People with MDS may not have the right amount of red blood cells (my case), white blood cells, and platelets.

In patients with this disease, many bone marrow cells do not develop into working blood cells. Instead, many of these cells die off in the bone marrow. This is why blood counts tend to be low in patients with MDS.

Your bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains immature cells, called stem cells. The stem cells can develop into the red blood cells that carry oxygen through your body, the white blood cells that fight infections, and the platelets that help with blood clotting. If you have a myelodysplastic syndrome, the stem cells do not mature into healthy blood cells. This leaves less room for healthy cells, which can lead to infection, anemia, or easy bleeding.